Return to Sports After Lasik Eye Surgery

LASIK is a great option for many athletes. The inconvenience of glasses or contacts can be eliminated through LASIK surgery. Without these annoyances, athletes can focus on the game.

One consideration that many athletes may have when looking into LASIK surgery is, how long until I can return to my sport?

While it depends on the type of surgery you had, and how severe your eye condition was prior to surgery, there are a few basic rules we suggest for all patients to follow. For the first 48 to 72 hours, we request that a patient shouldn’t rub their eyes or do anything that puts pressure on them. We also recommend avoiding anything that causes sweat to enter the eye.

After 72 hours, light exercise is allowed such as going to the gym, playing tennis or golf, but all with caution. As for more active sports, patients are normally allowed to play again after a little more than a month.

Damage to the eye after LASIK can result from pressure, trauma, or contaminants. This is why recovery is essential in helping reduce the risk of infection or damage to the corneal flap.

For athletes, having to deal with glasses in a contact sport is out of the question and the sweat and dirt of other sports make contacts extremely difficult. Of the professional athletes who have had LASIK surgery, professional male and female golfers of all ages make up a large percentage but other famous athletes have as well.

If you are looking to improve your game and overall enjoyment of your favorite sport, consider LASIK surgery. From the recreational weekend warrior to a professional athlete, many sports enthusiasts can benefit from a LASIK procedure.

Consider scheduling a meeting with Dr. James Khodabakhsh or Dr. John Hofbauer to see if LASIK is right for you.

You Might Also Enjoy...

What to Know About Keratoconus

Keratoconus is an eye disease which involves the normally round cornea bulging and forming into a cone shape. This happens progressively and is due to a thinning cornea.

Why is the world becoming nearsighted?

Myopia is frequently referred to as “nearsightedness” and is a very common form of visual impairment. In only a few decades, myopia has grown from affecting 25% to now 40% of the American population.

Retinitis Pigmentosa

Retinitis Pigmentosa is a genetic disorder that affects the cells within the retina. These photoreceptor cells produce essential proteins that are required in order to see.

Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Age-Related Macular degeneration is the number one cause of vision loss facing 10 million Americans today. Which is more than cataracts and glaucoma combined.